The effect of vaginal lactobacilli and estrogen on trichomoniasis in non-pregnant women Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 22, 2019
Creator
  • Torok, Michelle
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
Abstract
  • This research focused on the effect of vaginal lactobacilli and estrogen on trichomoniasis. Vaginal lactobacilli were evaluated by vaginal Gram stain, using criteria described by Nugent [1]. Women with [greater than or equal to]30 large Lactobacillus spp. morphotypes per oil immersion field were classified as having higher vaginal lactobacilli levels. Women with [less than or equal to]30 large Lactobacillus spp. morphotypes per oil immersion field were classified as having lower levels. After adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, education, concurrent bacterial vaginosis (BV), concurrent gonorrhea and/or syphilis, number of sex partners in the past 2 months, number of times the woman has sex in an average week, and oral contraceptive (OC) use, low levels of vaginal lactobacilli were positively associated with Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv) among women with greater than a high school education (odds ratio [OR]=4.6; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 2.2-9.7). Trichomonas vaginalis was not associated with low levels of lactobacilli among women with less than or equal to a high school education in multivariable analysis (OR=1.5; 95% CI, 0.7-3.5). The association between OC use and Tv was also estimated. Women who reported using OC with their most recent and/or frequent sexual partners were categorized as using OC. Women who did not report using OC with their most recent and/or frequent sexual partner were classified as not using OC. After adjusting for race/ethnicity, highest educational level attained, condom use, concurrent BV, level of vaginal lactobacilli, number of sex partners in the past year and number of times the woman has sex in an average week, OC was moderately protective against Tv (OR= 0.6, 95% CI 0.3-1.0). These data suggest that trichomoniasis may be influenced by level of vaginal lactobacilli and OC use.
Date of publication
DOI
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Miller, William
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Language
Access
  • Open access
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items