“SEPARATION IS NOT EQUALITY”: THE RACIAL DESEGREGATION MOVEMENT OF CREOLES OF COLOR IN NEW ORLEANS, 1862-1900 Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Yamanaka, Mishio
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of History
Abstract
  • This dissertation examines how Creoles of color from the Civil War to the end of the nineteenth century advocated for racial equality through the desegregation of public institutions in New Orleans. Previous scholarship has emphasized how Creoles’ class and ethnic identities as francophone transatlantic free people of color shaped their political activism. My dissertation argues that the significances of Creoles of color extends beyond these roots because their desegregation ideology served a common cause for all people; they built coalitions with Anglicized blacks and white radicals, and expanded their efforts beyond male participants to include women and children. Creoles of color succeeded in incorporating their desegregation agenda into the Republican Party’s platform in Louisiana during Reconstruction. Furthermore, they were able to lead anti-Jim Crow protests into the 1890s, which culminated in challenging the 1890 Louisiana separate car act in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson United States Supreme Court case. This dissertation specifically focuses on Creoles’ everyday struggles through the lens of public schools, transportation, and churches. By combining archival research and digital methodologies, it portrays Creole community members’ desegregation activism and explains how their shifting relationships with the Anglicized black population and white radicals shaped their civil rights movement that persisted for nearly four decades in late nineteenth century New Orleans.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Brundage, W. Fitzhugh
  • Jackson, Jerma
  • Sturkey, William
  • Kelley, Blair
  • Williams, Heather
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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