HELPING OBESE PREGNANT WOMEN ACHIEVE HEALTHY WEIGHT GAIN: IS PROVIDER INTERVENTION FEASIBLE? Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
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  • Marshburn, Mandy
    • Affiliation: School of Nursing
Abstract
  • Problem Statement: Obesity rates among reproductive aged women are steadily rising. Obesity has significant health implications for pregnant woman and their babies. Obese pregnant women are more likely to gain excessive weight during pregnancy, further increasing health risks. While it is not possible to reverse obesity during pregnancy, it is possible to prevent excessive weight gain. Individualized counseling about physical activity and nutrition given by the primary obstetrical provider is the most effective intervention in helping obese pregnant women achieve healthy gestational weight gain (GWG). Providers may not find it feasible to offer individualized counseling when prenatal care visits are restricted to 10-15 minutes. Purpose: The purpose of this DNP Project was to assess the feasibility of implementing the Clinician Lead Intervention of Daily Physical Activity and Healthy Eating (CINDHE) within a prenatal clinic in which a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) provides individual care for low-risk pregnant women. CINDHE is an evidence-based lifestyle intervention to assist obese pregnant women achieve healthy gestational weight gain. Methods: Participants were given Fitbit activity trackers to track daily physical activity and nutrition data was obtained by having participants complete a nutrition survey at each prenatal visit. Physical activity and nutrition data were reviewed and individualized counseling on diet and nutrition was given during each visit. Feasibility of implementation was assessed by tracking time spent with patients in the exam room and weekly transcribed voice memos recorded by the CNM. The effectiveness of the intervention was assessed by GWG, physical activity, and nutrition compared with historic matched cases. Analysis: Descriptive data analyses and correlations were translated conservatively, taking into consideration the small sample size and study design. Descriptive statistics were used to calculate results of quantitative data (time of visits, weight gain, physical activity, nutrition). Qualitative data (provider perception and patient satisfaction) were coded, organized into common themes, and placed into table format to translate results. Results: CINDHE proved feasible to implement. Data demonstrated that the intervention was effective in achieving healthy GWG. Participants demonstrated the ability to increase physical activity levels and make healthy food choices.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Yeo, SeonAe
  • Leeman, Jennifer
  • Belch, Jeremy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2017
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