The influences of committed intimate relationships on work outcomes: examining the role of relationship-to-work permeability Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Aldridge, William Allen
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience
Abstract
  • Current research regarding the influences of committed intimate relationships on work is sparse and lacks a comprehensive evaluation of the intimate relationship domain in relation to work. Therefore, using a large sample of workers from diverse occupations and organizational positions, the current study examined the influences of a broad set of intimate relationship experiences on several work outcomes that have traditionally been of interest to organizations and organizational behaviorists. Moreover, the current literature is largely reflective of the assumption that intimate relationships influence work in the same way for all people, which may not be the case. Therefore, the current investigation evaluated the roles of (a) relationship-to-work permeability and (b) relationship-to-work permeability in combination with intimate partner role identification, in moderating the influences of committed intimate relationships on work outcomes. Results suggested that relationship-to-work permeability does play a significant role in determining the nature and strength of influences of committed intimate relationships on work, whereas intimate partner role identification, at least in combination with relationship-to-work permeability, may not be as important. Specifically, among those individuals who more frequently psychologically or behaviorally engaged with their intimate relationship while at work (i.e., higher relationship-to-work permeability), (a) higher frequency of negative intimate relationship behaviors predicted less favorable work outcomes and (b) trends suggested that higher frequency of positive intimate relationship behaviors predicted more favorable work outcomes. Alternatively, among those individuals who less frequently psychologically or behaviorally engaged with their intimate relationship while at work (i.e., lower relationship-to-work permeability), (a) higher frequency of negative intimate relationship behaviors predicted more favorable work outcomes, whereas (b) trends suggested that the frequency of positive intimate relationship behaviors and work outcomes were not associated. The current investigation also found support for a new measure of relationship-to-work permeability, the Relationship-to-Work Permeability Scale. This is a relatively brief measure that assesses relationship-to-work permeability among four different factors: Think/Feel, Communication, Representations, and Physical Presence. The role and nature of relationship-to-work permeability are discussed, along with implications for future research and for understanding couple functioning and organizational behavior larger contexts.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Baucom, Donald
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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  • Open access
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