The Influence of Maternal Psychosocial Factors and Household Composition on Infant Feeding Outcomes Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Barrett, Katherine
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Anthropology
Abstract
  • The present study explores if maternal psychosocial factors, specifically self-esteem and depressive symptomology, and the presence of an infant's grandmother in the household influence infant feeding styles and nutritional outcomes for infants nine months of age. Participants include 160 low-income, African-American mother-infant pairs in central North Carolina. Results indicate that parental self-efficacy, parental satisfaction, and depressive symptomology are significantly associated with infant feeding styles but not inappropriate feeding. Parental self-efficacy is positively associated with restrictive practices, whereas satisfaction is negatively associated with pressuring practices. Depression is associated with pressuring feeding styles. The presence of an infant's grandmother in many cases modifies these relationships to protect against inappropriate feeding.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Sorensen, Mark
  • Bentley, Margaret
  • Thompson, Amanda
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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  • Chapel Hill, NC
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