Federal Funding Matters: Does Type of Reading Excellence Act Initiative and School Effectiveness Predict Kindergarten Through Second-Grade Students' Two-Year Reading Growth? Public Deposited

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  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Amendum, Steven
    • Affiliation: School of Education
Abstract
  • The research questions were: (a) Is there a relationship between Type of Reading Excellence Act (REA) Initiative and kindergarten through second-grade students' two-year reading growth; (b) Is there a relationship between School Effectiveness and kindergarten through second-grade students' two-year reading growth; and (c) Is there a combined effect of Type of REA Initiative and School Effectiveness on kindergarten through second-grade students' two-year reading growth? Type of REA Initiative was conceptualized by two dimensions--degree of initiative structure and degree of support for teachers' learning of the initiative. Using a two-year longitudinal design, data were collected at 16 REA schools in seven different districts. Children who began school in kindergarten, first, or second grade were followed into first, second, or third grade. Four child reading assessments were administered to students at the beginning, middle, and end of each of the two years. Questionnaires were completed by principals at the end of each of the two years. Site-based literacy facilitators maintained REA Staff Development Logs which they turned in at the end of Year 1 and end of Year 2. A series of hierarchical linear models was conducted in stages, first examining effects in relation to Instructional Reading Level growth, and then in relation to selected reading subprocess growth. Main conclusions were the following: (a) Degree of REA initiative structure and extent of school effectiveness had a combined affect on the amount of Instructional Reading Level growth students made. Students who made the most Instructional Reading Level growth were from schools with REA initiatives with low structure and high degrees of school effectiveness. (b) Degree of support for teachers' learning and extent of school effectiveness had a combined affect on the amount of Instructional Reading Level growth students made. Students who made the most Instructional Reading Level growth were from schools with high degrees of support for teachers' learning and low degrees of school effectiveness. (c) Neither type of REA initiative (degree of structure or degree of support) nor how effective a school was significantly related to growth in the reading subprocess outcomes, except for Phonics Knowledge.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Hall, Leigh
  • Boone, Harriet
  • Hamm, Jill
  • Vernon-Feagans, Lynne
  • Fitzgerald, Jill
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2008
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