The Tinsley case decision Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Jones, Bayinaah R.
    • Affiliation: School of Education
Abstract
  • What is the collective action necessary to overcome educational inequality? And was educational inequality overcome through legalized school desegregation? These are the questions that drive the following study. This study looks closely at the community impact from a specific school desegregation case decided in 1986 in Northern California. Through a court order, local school districts were directed to allow a small portion of African American and white students to transfer voluntarily to neighboring school districts outside of their assigned boundaries in order to create racial balance, thereby improving educational achievement for African American students. The program, known as the Tinsley Voluntary Transfer program is in existence today. Here, the researcher begins unpacking the meaning of school desegregation and its impact in a local context. This study grounded in critical race theory also suggests a need to reassess outcomes and conclusions from 52 years of legalized school desegregation cases. The gap in educational achievement between African Americans and whites participating in the voluntary transfer program and African Americans and whites not participating in the voluntary transfer program persists at virtually the same statistical average in both settings. While results from the study do indicate individual African American students who participate in the program show improvement over African American students who do not participate in the program, there is overwhelming evidence that no marked improvement in the collective educational achievement of African American students visà- vis white students came as a result of the Tinsley case.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Noblit, George W.
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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  • Open access
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