VISIONARY POLICY: BILL CLINTON, THE BOSNIAN WAR, AND AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS IN THE POST-COLD WAR ERA, 1992-1995 Public Deposited

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  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Covington, James
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of History
Abstract
  • Bill Clinton assumed office during a particularly challenging period of American history. After the fall of the Soviet Union, the United States enjoyed a period of unprecedented power and authority. Clinton was elected to office largely for his domestic policies, however, his vision for America’s position in the post-Cold War world steered his foreign policy, particularly with respect to Europe. Clinton’s vision was more inclusive and encompassing than that of his predecessor, George H. W. Bush. During the post-Cold War years, Bush was more inclined to let Europe sort out their own problems, particularly in the case of Bosnia. Clinton, however, was more willing to see post-Cold War European problems as American issues. The Bosnian War represents a point where these two ideals collided. Guided by this vision, Clinton overcame challenges from the European Community, political adversaries, and even his own public en route to intervening in Bosnia.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Morgan, Michael
  • Lee, Wayne
  • Caddell, Joseph
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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  • Chapel Hill, NC
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