Team Dynamics and Learning Behavior in Hospitals: A Study of Error Reporting by Nurses Public Deposited

Downloadable Content

Download PDF
Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • Munn, Lindsay
    • Affiliation: School of Nursing
Abstract
  • Error reporting is the primary way that hospitals identify errors and near misses, and it is essential for organizational learning and improvement to occur. However, it is widely recognized that errors in hospitals are significantly underreported. As a result there are numerous lost opportunities for health care organizations to learn from errors and improve the care delivered to patients. The purpose of this study was to use the model of work-team learning as the theoretical foundation to examine the error reporting behaviors of nurses. The study examined the team factors of safety climate, leader inclusiveness, and psychological safety and their effect on nurses’ error reporting. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used for the study. Data were collected from nurses and nurse managers through self-administered surveys. The research questions of the study were answered with data from up to 814 nurses and 43 nurse managers using methods for modeling correlated outcomes. Bootstrap confidence intervals with bias correction were used to determine the mediating effect of psychological safety. The results of the study demonstrated that the team factors of safety climate, leader inclusiveness, and psychological safety positively predicted nurses’ perceptions of the frequency of error reporting on their unit. Furthermore, the results indicated that these same team factors of safety climate, leader inclusiveness, and psychological safety negatively predicted the number of error reports that nurses reported submitting over a 12-month period. The study findings also showed that psychological safety mediated the relationship between the interprofessional relationships dimension of the safety climate and nurses’ perceptions of error reporting frequency on their unit as well as the relationship between leader inclusiveness and nurses’ perceptions of error reporting frequency on their unit. This study’s findings underscore the complexity of error reporting in hospitals and the need for more advanced research methods that allow for deeper investigation and explanation of error reporting in hospitals. This study lays the groundwork for future study by demonstrating the importance of safety climate, leader inclusiveness, and psychological safety to help explain error reporting by nurses.
Date of publication
Keyword
DOI
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Knafl, George
  • Willis, Tina
  • Lynn, Mary
  • Mayer, Celeste
  • Jones, Cheryl
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2016
Language
Parents:

This work has no parents.

Items