AN EXAMINATION OF ADMINISTRATORS’, TEACHERS’, AND SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS’ CONCERNS ABOUT AND PERCEPTIONS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF MULTI-TIERED SYSTEM OF SUPPORTS ACROSS NORTH CAROLINA Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Aslan, Sevgi
    • Affiliation: School of Education, School Psychology Graduate Program
Abstract
  • Response to intervention (RTI) has become one of the most discussed innovation initiatives since its recognition by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2004. With the 2004 reauthorization of IDEA, RTI was recognized as an alternative to discrepancy model for the identification of students with specific learning disability (SLD). RTI is now considered as a part of Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) and integrated with Positive Behavior Intervention Support (PBIS). North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) have had the option to use RTI as a means for determining SLD eligibility since 2004, rather than the discrepancy model. In fact, NCDPI is in the process of changing policy to eliminate the IQ-achievement discrepancy model as a permissible approach and aims to use MTSS data to identify and determine eligibility for students with SLD for special education services. Changes in policy put pressure on educators as they raise questions related to their concerns about the implementation of the MTSS framework. According to Hall, George, and Rutherford (1977), not necessarily the situation around them but individuals’ perceptions are the predictors of their concerns; therefore, it is essential to take into account how they perceive their skills and MTSS practices of their schools before addressing their concerns. The purpose of this study was to investigate how administrators, teachers, and school psychologists in North Carolina perceive their MTSS skills and their school’s MTSS implementation and to what extent their perceptions predict their stages of concern regarding implementing MTSS. Following these purposes, online surveys including Perceptions of RTI Skills Survey and Perceptions of Practices Survey and a questionnaire, Stages of Concern Questionnaire, were administered to 84 North Carolina public school personnel. Statistical analyses indicated significant differences in school personnel’s perceptions of their MTSS skills and their school’s MTSS implementation, as well as stages of concern regarding implementing MTSS by their staff position. Besides, statistically significant associations were observed between teachers’ years implementing MTSS and their perceptions of MTSS skills, perceptions of MTSS practices, and stages of concern. Furthermore, school personnel’s staff position was a significant predictor of their stages of concern regarding implementing MTSS. Finally, school personnel’s perceptions of their MTSS skills and their school’s MTSS practices improved the prediction of their stages of concern over and above staff position alone. Implications for policy and practice are provided.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Schiltz, Alisha
  • Evarrs, Sandra
  • Wery, Jessica
  • Simeonsson, Rune
  • Knotek, Steven
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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