PHONETIC MOTIVATION FOR DIACHRONIC SOUND CHANGE IN BANTU LANGUAGES AS EVIDENCED BY VOICELESS PRENASALIZED STOP PERCEPTION BY NATIVE SOMALI CHIZIGULA SPEAKERS Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Boone, Haley
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Linguistics
Abstract
  • Two hypotheses were tested as triggering nasal effacement (leaving an aspiration contrast) in voiceless prenasalized stops in Bantu languages: Aspiration is more reliably produced than voiceless nasalization. Voiceless nasalization is harder to hear than aspiration. Productions from two Somali Chizigula speakers were measured to test the cue reliability of nasalization amplitude versus aspiration duration. Aspiration is a more reliably produced cue, providing better distinction between voiceless stops. The perception of voiceless nasalization and aspiration by 10 Somali Chizigula participants was tested. Native productions of voiceless prenasalized and plain stops were cross-spliced to contain pre-burst information from one stop type and post-burst from the other. Participants then identified each stimulus as prenasalized or plain. Nasalized-only stimuli were identified as “prenasalized” significantly less than control prenasalized stimuli, but aspirated-only stimuli did not receive significantly less “prenasalized” responses than prenasalized controls. Aspiration appears easier to hear, but not more heavily weighted than nasalization.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Smith, Jennifer
  • Moreton, A. Elliott
  • Temkin Martinez, Michal
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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