RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN LOWER EXTREMITY MOVEMENT QUALITY, INTERNAL TRAINING LOADS, AND INJURY RISK IN NCAA DIVISION I MALE COLLEGIATE SOCCER ATHLETES Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 22, 2019
Creator
  • Condon, Tara
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Exercise and Sport Science
Abstract
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships amongst internal training loads (ITL), lower extremity (LE) movement quality, and injury risk in male collegiate soccer athletes. Fifty-two Division-I athletes consented to this study. Daily ITL were collected and tracked over the course of two consecutive seasons using a rated perceived exertion scale and session duration. LE movement assessments were performed in preseason using the Landing Error Scoring system (LESS), and were used to create two groups: poor movers (n=33,LESS ≥5), and good movers (n=19,LESS ≤4). Repeated measures ANOVAs and Chi Squares were utilized for analysis. Mid-season ITL were significantly lower compared to early (p<.001) and late (p<.001) season ITL. No significant differences in ITL were found between poor and good movers. Early-season injury risk was not influenced by movement quality or ITL but future large sample studies are needed in NCAA collegiate athletes.
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Advisor
  • Eckard, Timothy
  • Padua, Darin A.
  • Wikstrom, Erik
  • Aguilar, Alain
  • Frank, Barnett
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2018
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