WHAT MAKES US MINDFUL AND WHY DOES IT MATTER? RELATIONSHIPS AMONG MEANINGFULNESS, STATE MINDFULNESS, AND COUNTERPRODUCTIVE WORK BEHAVIOR Public Deposited

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  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Long, Erin
    • Affiliation: Kenan-Flagler Business School
Abstract
  • Mindfulness has received increased attention in organizational research and practice, with the majority of work focusing on the beneficial, buffering effects of trait mindfulness and mindfulness interventions. I extend work on mindfulness in the workplace by examining the causes and consequences of daily and momentary within-person fluctuations in state mindfulness. Grounded in theories of self-regulation, this research helps shed light on dynamic, everyday antecedents and outcomes of state mindfulness in work contexts. Specifically, I argue that increases in meaningful work perceptions activate mindful states, which in turn have important associations with counterproductive work behavior (CWB). Across two studies—one laboratory experiment and a second experience sampling study conducted in the field—I test a mediated moderation model whereby fluctuations in meaningful work perceptions indirectly impact employee CWB through state mindfulness. Study 1 examines the impact of meaningful work on state mindfulness and CWB in a sample of undergraduate business students in a laboratory experiment. Study 2 extends the first study by examining dynamic fluctuations among nurses’ experiences of meaningfulness, mindful states, and their CWB using an experience sampling methodology (ESM). Evidence from both studies converge to support the indirect effect of meaningfulness on CWB through state mindfulness, although these relationships were not conditional on controlled motivation. Implications and future research directions are discussed in light of these findings.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Edwards, Jeffrey
  • Christian, Michael
  • Spreitzer, Gretchen
  • Fragale, Alison
  • Melwani, Shimul
Degree
  • Doctor of Philosophy
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2017
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