IMPROVING STAFF COMFORT WITH AND DELIVERY OF BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING INTERVENTIONS TO ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT MALES PRESENTING FOR SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTION SCREENING Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 21, 2019
Creator
  • Bates, Kelly
    • Affiliation: School of Nursing
Abstract
  • Background: More than two-thirds of sexually transmitted infections (STI) occur in Americans under age 25. There are nearly 20 million new STIs each year and this number is increasing. Several organizations recommend including STI screening and behavioral counseling in every adolescent health appointment to reduce STI risk. However, adolescents and young adults (AYA), particularly males, do not consistently receive this care. This project aimed to improve the frequency and quality of behavioral counseling delivered to AYA males at a Health Department in North Carolina through development of an evidence-based staff workshop. Methods: This project was developed using quality improvement methodology. A chart review was completed of AYA males who presented for STI screening during a three-month period. These data were used to design the workshop. Attendees were asked to complete one pre- and two post-surveys to assess their perceptions of this curriculum. An additional chart review was completed after the workshop to assess for changes in staff documentation of behavioral counseling interventions delivered to AYA males presenting for STI screening in the 11 weeks after the workshop. Results: The initial chart audit highlighted potential areas for future staff training, including improving documentation practices, distribution of free condoms, and alcohol consumption classification. Overall, staff survey responses were positive and suggested that staff were receptive to incorporating behavioral counseling into patient encounters. After the workshop, there was a statistically significant improvement in the proportion of patients with documentation on their condom use (z = -2.64, p = 0.0042, one-tailed) and in the proportion of patients who were offered free condoms χ2 (2, N = 52) = 11.27, p = .004; (z = -2.64, p = 0.0042, one-tailed). There was also a significant decrease in the proportion of patients who had an unclassifiable alcohol consumption level χ2 (4, N = 39) = 17.29, p = .002; (z= 3.33, p= 0.00043, one-tailed). Conclusions: Healthcare professionals should receive training as this has been demonstrated to improve the effectiveness of behavioral counseling. Importantly, this project suggests that HCPs are receptive to receiving training and that such training may improve the delivery of STI risk reducing interventions.
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Advisor
  • Davis, Amanda
  • Mulholland, Andrea
  • Hodges, Eric
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2018
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