THE INCLUSION AND NEGOTIATION OF THE APPROPRIATE FEMALE PRESENCE IN PUBLIC: THAMUGADI AND CUICUL Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • March 19, 2019
Creator
  • McCullough, Katelin
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Classics
Abstract
  • This treatment begins to re-contextualize some of the epigraphic material from the Roman African cities of Thamugadi and Cuicul by taking into account associated statuary and probable locations for these monuments within the town centers. In order to go beyond simply noting that women were part of the urban fabric of Roman communities in the West, this discussion considers the specific economic context of the North African region and its impact on how women chose to present themselves both as a part of the public fabric of the community and in a manner that would have been acceptable in a male-dominated, Roman society. Evidence from North Africa demonstrates that Roman influence did not translate into consistent honorific practices and that the ways in which women were included in public space display distinct local patterns even within the same province or across cities with similar social structures.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Gates-Foster, Jennifer
  • Sams, Kenneth
  • Haggis, Donald
Degree
  • Master of Arts
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School
Graduation year
  • 2015
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Location
  • Africa
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Place of publication
  • Chapel Hill, NC
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