REDISCOVERING TIVOLI: AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION INTO WILLIAM R. DAVIE’S PLANTATION HOME Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • April 28, 2020
Creator
  • Armstrong, Mary
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Curriculum in Archaeology
Abstract
  • When North Carolina legislator and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill founder William R. Davie retired from political life, he chose to retreat to a plantation on the Catawba River in South Carolina called Tivoli. This plantation has been investigated archaeologically three different times, and each time has brought more into question. How long was the site occupied? Do we know the site of the main house? Was there a slave site associated with the property? This thesis serves to answer these questions through an analysis of archaeological evidence from two separate sites on the property: 38CS299 (RLA SoC-636), which has been thought by past investigators to be the main house site and contains significant structural remains including brick footers and two separate hearths, and 38CS301 (RLA SoC-637), which has been deemed as a possible slave quarter site. The analysis uses lines of evidence presented by the features and artifacts present and the property’s history, which begins before Davie’s occupation and ends well after his death in 1820. There is a possibility that 38CS299 is the main house site, though it is also possible the structure was repurposed in Davie’s time. 38CS301 carries some slave quarter site hallmarks, and, when compared to 38CS299, there is distinct possibility that this is where Davie’s slaves resided.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Davis, R.P. Stephen Jr.
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Curriculum in Archaeology
Degree
  • Bachelor of Arts
Graduation year
  • 2020
Language
  • English
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