"I Am Not Going Back-lah": An Econometric Analysis of Post-Study Inclinations Among Malaysian Students In The United States Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • February 26, 2019
Creator
  • Hoo, Yi Rong
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Economics
Abstract
  • The research in this paper investigates the post-study inclinations of Malaysian students currently studying in the United States after they complete their desired level of education in the US by estimating a multinomial logistic regression. As in previous studies, students studying abroad are thought to be a source of brain drain among developing countries. In a survey conducted for this research, students were asked if they are inclined to return to Malaysia immediately, remain in the United States temporarily or remain in the United States permanently. It was found students who are scholars sponsored by scholarships from various institutions in Malaysia including the Malaysian government are more inclined to return to Malaysia immediately suggesting that such scholarship programs are viable policy tools to counter the brain drain phenomenon among Malaysian students studying abroad. Interestingly, it is also found that students who did not attend public national schools in Malaysia are more inclined to remain in the United States thus begging the question if the structure of Malaysia’s schooling system has an influence on Malaysia’s brain drain predicament. This finding though, would merit further research. It is also found that even after controlling for potential endogeneity, students who had internship experience in Malaysia are less inclined to remain in the United States. Lastly, through a series of different hypothetical scenarios, it is identified that students who desire to pursue an education level beyond a bachelor’s degree to be more inclined to remain in the US permanently if granted permanent residence.
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  • In Copyright
Note
  • Funding: None
  • Funding: Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF)
Advisor
  • Joubert, Clement
Degree
  • Bachelor of Arts
Honors level
  • Honors
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Extent
  • 55 p.
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