Britons, Beasts, and Benighted Savages: British Superiority in Nineteenth Century Children’s Periodicals Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • May 5, 2020
Creator
  • Soboeiro, Andrew
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of History
Abstract
  • An intrepid British explorer outwits and escapes a horde of bloodthirsty African cannibals. The Royal Navy defeats a fleet of merciless Arab slave traders. A cabal of Indian thieves plots to rob a British official but fails because the thieves are too untrustworthy to cooperate. Stories like these frequently appeared in British children’s magazines during the nineteenth century. Meant to entertain child readers and teach them moral lessons, these stories also reinforced popular racial and ethnic stereotypes, as well as the belief that white, Protestant Britons were superior to other peoples. By studying the stories published in nineteenth-century periodicals, I have illuminated the ways in which British children learned to conceive of race, ethnicity, and national identity.
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Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Note
  • Funding: Student Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF)
Advisor
  • Pennybacker, Susan
Degree
  • Bachelor of Arts
Honors level
  • Honors
Degree granting institution
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Graduation year
  • 2015
Language
  • English
Extent
  • 95
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