Food Therapy in Contemporary Japanese Food Films Public Deposited

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Last Modified
  • May 16, 2020
Creator
  • Farmer, Tatiana
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Global Studies
Abstract
  • We have all heard the phrase, “eating our troubles away.” What if consuming a well-prepared meal could really be the answer to all of your problems? What if food could heal you? Many Japanese food films created in the early 2000s explore this idea. In this thesis, I explore why and how food becomes a mechanism for healing to people in four food films: Kamome Shokudo (2006), Rinko’s Restaurant (2010), Shiawase no Pan (2012), and The Chef of South Polar (2009). Through in-depth film analysis, I discovered three reoccurring themes that are significant in the process of healing: nature, companionship, and magic. I argue throughout the essay that these films created in the early 2000s all reflect on Japan’s “Lost Decade,” a period during the 1990s that witnessed a drastic economic recession, topped with various societal changes and environmental tragedies. The films respond to problems of modernity and mental health that emerged within Japan at that time. Food is not presented as a means of healing tangible illnesses of the body, but instead as being able to heal illnesses of the mind.
Date of publication
DOI
Resource type
Rights statement
  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Brodey, Inger
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • Bardsley, Jan
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Asian Studies
Degree
  • Bachelor of Arts
Graduation year
  • 2020
Language
  • English
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