Active transportation policy decisions in response to COVID-19: Case studies from four North American cities Public Deposited

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  • April 16, 2021
Creator
  • Stockton, Emma
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of City and Regional Planning
    • Other Affiliation: Emma Stockton
Abstract
  • This Master’s Project explores the planning processes, implementation, and public reactions to new active transportation infrastructure built in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in four North American cities (Washington, DC, Chapel Hill, NC, Oakland, CA, Halifax, Nova Scotia). The implementation of active transportation infrastructure moved abnormally quickly to respond to an increased demand for walking and biking in local areas due to COVID-19 lockdowns, restriction of travel and closure of many businesses. Interviews were conducted with transportation planners working for each of the four cities to gain insight into each city’s experience, lessons learned, and predictions for the future of active transportation infrastructure. The case studies particularly focus on two topics: the community engagement process with residents while physical distancing measures were in place, as well as equity considerations and perceptions of new active transportation programs. It is crucial to understand how these decisions were made as well as the implications of these decisions to guide future active transportation planning, implementation, and evaluation.
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  • In Copyright
Advisor
  • Combs, Tab
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of City and Regional Planning
    • Other Affiliation: Tab Combs
Degree
  • Master of City and Regional Planning
Graduation year
  • 2021
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