Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Tinnitus Retraining Therapy Outcomes: A Systematic Review Public Deposited

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  • February 22, 2019
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  • Boyce, Katharina
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences
  • Frost, Melanie
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences
  • Wilson, Jasmine
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Department of Allied Health Sciences, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences
Abstract
  • Purpose or Research Questions: In adults with tinnitus, does cognitive behavioral therapy or tinnitus retraining therapy reduce symptoms and/or improve quality of life compared to adults with tinnitus who receive no intervention? Background: Tinnitus is defined as the perception of sound in the absence of external sound. Prevalence estimates are highly variable and are likely to increase with age as the prevalence of hearing loss increases, due to the association between the two conditions. Although tinnitus is highly correlated with hearing loss, many sufferers of tinnitus have measurably normal hearing. For some, tinnitus can become debilitating, interfering with quality of life and contributing to a cyclical relationship with depression and anxiety. Historically, many treatments for tinnitus have been explored, often with unsatisfactory results. However, for two of the most well-studied treatments, tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), research has shown evidence of symptom reduction and improvements of quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. Methods/Proposed Methods: This systematic review aims to analyze and compare outcomes for two of the most common treatments for tinnitus, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT), compared to no intervention for the treatment of subjective tinnitus. A search of literature in peer-reviewed journals from PubMed and PsychInfo databases between the years of 2006-2017 yielded 21 high-quality studies evaluating outcomes for CBT and/or TRT in the 18 and older population. Results/Anticipated Results: Full analysis of data is currently in progress and will be incorporated upon completion. Discussion: Outcome measures were heterogeneous, underscoring the need for future research using standardized questionnaires for the purposes of comparison analysis.
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  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Department of Allied Health Sciences. Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences. Student Research Day (9th: 2017: Chapel Hill, NC)
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