ingest cdrApp 2018-06-13T19:38:10.600Z 51cd2fe2-3fd7-401f-a923-a97bc3db68a2 modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2018-06-13T20:56:12.492Z Setting exclusive relation addDatastream MD_TECHNICAL fedoraAdmin 2018-06-13T20:56:13.139Z Adding technical metadata derived by FITS addDatastream MD_FULL_TEXT fedoraAdmin 2018-06-13T20:56:36.139Z Adding full text metadata extracted by Apache Tika modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2018-06-13T20:56:58.638Z Setting exclusive relation modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-07-11T10:57:17.364Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-08-17T12:51:17.671Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-09-27T15:46:27.504Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-10-12T07:01:34.515Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-10-17T12:18:31.054Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2019-03-21T16:52:43.227Z Rae Yan Author Department of English and Comparative Literature College of Arts and Sciences “This Seemingly So Solid Body”: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction We often presume that “anatomy” is, simply, the scientific practice of deconstructing and dissecting the body. “‘This Seemingly So Solid Body’: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction,” returns us to a period in the nineteenth-century when stable ideas of what it meant to anatomize and who could be an anatomist were undergoing serious challenge by a group of investigators interested in a now forgotten epistemology: philosophical anatomy. In the most straightforward sense of the term, philosophical anatomy describes the attempt to find universal forms and ideal structures common to all organisms through the practices of comparative anatomy. Philosophical anatomists saw the work of anatomy as one not specific to scientific communities, but common across many disciplines. I argue that philosophical anatomy reconstitutes anatomizing as more than a reductive, materialist science. Anatomizing, in this context, exceeds the simple dissection and reduction of human and animal bodies and becomes, instead, a creative reimagining of how such bodies relate to each other and even to non-human forces and energies. Studying the ways in which Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and George Eliot engage philosophical anatomy in their literary works, I reveal how philosophical anatomy profoundly shapes our present representational and interpretive practices. Spring 2018 2018 English literature Science history Literature anatomy, history of science, literature and science, philosophical anatomy, Victorian literature eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution English and Comparative Literature John McGowan Thesis advisor Beverly Taylor Thesis advisor Laurie Langbauer Thesis advisor Jeanne Moskal Thesis advisor Kimberly Stern Thesis advisor text Rae Yan Author Department of English and Comparative Literature College of Arts and Sciences “This Seemingly So Solid Body”: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction We often presume that “anatomy” is, simply, the scientific practice of deconstructing and dissecting the body. “‘This Seemingly So Solid Body’: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction,” returns us to a period in the nineteenth-century when stable ideas of what it meant to anatomize and who could be an anatomist were undergoing serious challenge by a group of investigators interested in a now forgotten epistemology: philosophical anatomy. In the most straightforward sense of the term, philosophical anatomy describes the attempt to find universal forms and ideal structures common to all organisms through the practices of comparative anatomy. Philosophical anatomists saw the work of anatomy as one not specific to scientific communities, but common across many disciplines. I argue that philosophical anatomy reconstitutes anatomizing as more than a reductive, materialist science. Anatomizing, in this context, exceeds the simple dissection and reduction of human and animal bodies and becomes, instead, a creative reimagining of how such bodies relate to each other and even to non-human forces and energies. Studying the ways in which Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and George Eliot engage philosophical anatomy in their literary works, I reveal how philosophical anatomy profoundly shapes our present representational and interpretive practices. Spring 2018 2018 English literature Science history Literature anatomy, history of science, literature and science, philosophical anatomy, Victorian literature eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution English and Comparative Literature John McGowan Thesis advisor Beverly Taylor Thesis advisor Laurie Langbauer Thesis advisor Jeanne Moskal Thesis advisor Kimberly Stern Thesis advisor text Rae Yan Author Department of English and Comparative Literature College of Arts and Sciences “This Seemingly So Solid Body”: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction We often presume that “anatomy” is, simply, the scientific practice of deconstructing and dissecting the body. “‘This Seemingly So Solid Body’: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction,” returns us to a period in the nineteenth-century when stable ideas of what it meant to anatomize and who could be an anatomist were undergoing serious challenge by a group of investigators interested in a now forgotten epistemology: philosophical anatomy. In the most straightforward sense of the term, philosophical anatomy describes the attempt to find universal forms and ideal structures common to all organisms through the practices of comparative anatomy. Philosophical anatomists saw the work of anatomy as one not specific to scientific communities, but common across many disciplines. I argue that philosophical anatomy reconstitutes anatomizing as more than a reductive, materialist science. Anatomizing, in this context, exceeds the simple dissection and reduction of human and animal bodies and becomes, instead, a creative reimagining of how such bodies relate to each other and even to non-human forces and energies. Studying the ways in which Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and George Eliot engage philosophical anatomy in their literary works, I reveal how philosophical anatomy profoundly shapes our present representational and interpretive practices. Spring 2018 2018 English literature Science history Literature anatomy, history of science, literature and science, philosophical anatomy, Victorian literature eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation English and Comparative Literature John McGowan Thesis advisor Beverly Taylor Thesis advisor Laurie Langbauer Thesis advisor Jeanne Moskal Thesis advisor Kimberly Stern Thesis advisor text University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Degree granting institution Rae Yan Creator Department of English and Comparative Literature College of Arts and Sciences “This Seemingly So Solid Body”: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction We often presume that “anatomy” is, simply, the scientific practice of deconstructing and dissecting the body. “‘This Seemingly So Solid Body’: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction,” returns us to a period in the nineteenth-century when stable ideas of what it meant to anatomize and who could be an anatomist were undergoing serious challenge by a group of investigators interested in a now forgotten epistemology: philosophical anatomy. In the most straightforward sense of the term, philosophical anatomy describes the attempt to find universal forms and ideal structures common to all organisms through the practices of comparative anatomy. Philosophical anatomists saw the work of anatomy as one not specific to scientific communities, but common across many disciplines. I argue that philosophical anatomy reconstitutes anatomizing as more than a reductive, materialist science. Anatomizing, in this context, exceeds the simple dissection and reduction of human and animal bodies and becomes, instead, a creative reimagining of how such bodies relate to each other and even to non-human forces and energies. Studying the ways in which Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and George Eliot engage philosophical anatomy in their literary works, I reveal how philosophical anatomy profoundly shapes our present representational and interpretive practices. English literature Science history Literature anatomy; history of science; literature and science; philosophical anatomy; Victorian literature eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation English and Comparative Literature John McGowan Thesis advisor Beverly Taylor Thesis advisor Laurie Langbauer Thesis advisor Jeanne Moskal Thesis advisor Kimberly Stern Thesis advisor text University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Degree granting institution 2018 2018-05 Rae Yan Author Department of English and Comparative Literature College of Arts and Sciences “This Seemingly So Solid Body”: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction We often presume that “anatomy” is, simply, the scientific practice of deconstructing and dissecting the body. “‘This Seemingly So Solid Body’: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction,” returns us to a period in the nineteenth-century when stable ideas of what it meant to anatomize and who could be an anatomist were undergoing serious challenge by a group of investigators interested in a now forgotten epistemology: philosophical anatomy. In the most straightforward sense of the term, philosophical anatomy describes the attempt to find universal forms and ideal structures common to all organisms through the practices of comparative anatomy. Philosophical anatomists saw the work of anatomy as one not specific to scientific communities, but common across many disciplines. I argue that philosophical anatomy reconstitutes anatomizing as more than a reductive, materialist science. Anatomizing, in this context, exceeds the simple dissection and reduction of human and animal bodies and becomes, instead, a creative reimagining of how such bodies relate to each other and even to non-human forces and energies. Studying the ways in which Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and George Eliot engage philosophical anatomy in their literary works, I reveal how philosophical anatomy profoundly shapes our present representational and interpretive practices. Spring 2018 2018 English literature Science history Literature anatomy, history of science, literature and science, philosophical anatomy, Victorian literature eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution English and Comparative Literature John McGowan Thesis advisor Beverly Taylor Thesis advisor Laurie Langbauer Thesis advisor Jeanne Moskal Thesis advisor Kimberly Stern Thesis advisor text Rae Yan Author Department of English and Comparative Literature College of Arts and Sciences “This Seemingly So Solid Body”: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction We often presume that “anatomy” is, simply, the scientific practice of deconstructing and dissecting the body. “‘This Seemingly So Solid Body’: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction,” returns us to a period in the nineteenth-century when stable ideas of what it meant to anatomize and who could be an anatomist were undergoing serious challenge by a group of investigators interested in a now forgotten epistemology: philosophical anatomy. In the most straightforward sense of the term, philosophical anatomy describes the attempt to find universal forms and ideal structures common to all organisms through the practices of comparative anatomy. Philosophical anatomists saw the work of anatomy as one not specific to scientific communities, but common across many disciplines. I argue that philosophical anatomy reconstitutes anatomizing as more than a reductive, materialist science. Anatomizing, in this context, exceeds the simple dissection and reduction of human and animal bodies and becomes, instead, a creative reimagining of how such bodies relate to each other and even to non-human forces and energies. Studying the ways in which Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and George Eliot engage philosophical anatomy in their literary works, I reveal how philosophical anatomy profoundly shapes our present representational and interpretive practices. Spring 2018 2018 English literature Science history Literature anatomy, history of science, literature and science, philosophical anatomy, Victorian literature eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation English and Comparative Literature John McGowan Thesis advisor Beverly Taylor Thesis advisor Laurie Langbauer Thesis advisor Jeanne Moskal Thesis advisor Kimberly Stern Thesis advisor text University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Degree granting institution Rae Yan Creator Department of English and Comparative Literature College of Arts and Sciences “This Seemingly So Solid Body”: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction We often presume that “anatomy” is, simply, the scientific practice of deconstructing and dissecting the body. “‘This Seemingly So Solid Body’: Philosophical Anatomy and Victorian Fiction,” returns us to a period in the nineteenth-century when stable ideas of what it meant to anatomize and who could be an anatomist were undergoing serious challenge by a group of investigators interested in a now forgotten epistemology: philosophical anatomy. In the most straightforward sense of the term, philosophical anatomy describes the attempt to find universal forms and ideal structures common to all organisms through the practices of comparative anatomy. Philosophical anatomists saw the work of anatomy as one not specific to scientific communities, but common across many disciplines. I argue that philosophical anatomy reconstitutes anatomizing as more than a reductive, materialist science. Anatomizing, in this context, exceeds the simple dissection and reduction of human and animal bodies and becomes, instead, a creative reimagining of how such bodies relate to each other and even to non-human forces and energies. Studying the ways in which Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and George Eliot engage philosophical anatomy in their literary works, I reveal how philosophical anatomy profoundly shapes our present representational and interpretive practices. 2018-05 2018 English literature Science history Literature anatomy; history of science; literature and science; philosophical anatomy; Victorian literature eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation John McGowan Thesis advisor Beverly Taylor Thesis advisor Laurie Langbauer Thesis advisor Jeanne Moskal Thesis advisor Kimberly Stern Thesis advisor text University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Degree granting institution Yan_unc_0153D_17778.pdf uuid:12f3298e-d9bf-4f52-baa0-a397e209713c 2020-06-13T00:00:00 2018-04-12T19:10:42Z proquest application/pdf 9690747