ingest cdrApp 2017-08-15T22:06:44.366Z d91e81c8-5a8a-4e8a-976c-cad4e396e5ee modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2017-08-15T22:07:25.335Z Setting exclusive relation modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2017-08-15T22:07:34.290Z Setting exclusive relation addDatastream MD_TECHNICAL fedoraAdmin 2017-08-15T22:07:43.332Z Adding technical metadata derived by FITS modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2017-08-15T22:08:01.017Z Setting exclusive relation addDatastream MD_FULL_TEXT fedoraAdmin 2017-08-15T22:08:10.772Z Adding full text metadata extracted by Apache Tika modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2017-08-15T22:08:29.314Z Setting exclusive relation modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT cdrApp 2017-08-22T13:58:28.343Z Setting exclusive relation modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-01-25T13:21:36.577Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-01-27T13:23:20.701Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-03-14T10:32:58.454Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-05-18T13:20:14.715Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-07-11T09:07:13.077Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-07-18T05:12:19.839Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-08-16T18:20:30.258Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-09-27T14:06:09.332Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-10-12T05:18:31.694Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2019-03-21T15:05:43.963Z Christopher Wretman Author School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. Spring 2017 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Diane Ward Thesis advisor text Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. Spring 2017 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Diane Ward Thesis advisor text Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. Spring 2017 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Diane Ward Thesis advisor text Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017-05 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Diane Ward Thesis advisor text Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Diane Ward Thesis advisor text 2017-05 Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Diane Ward Thesis advisor text 2017-05 Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Diane Ward Thesis advisor text 2017-05 Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Dianne Ward Thesis advisor text 2017-05 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Degree granting institution Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Dianne Ward Thesis advisor text 2017-05 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Degree granting institution Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Social Work Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Dianne Ward Thesis advisor text 2017-05 Christopher Wretman Creator School of Social Work Physical Activity Participation in Kindergarten and Children’s Cognitive and Academic Ability Promoting physical activity (PA) among children is a key research area of interest. Recently, there has been a desire to expand research linking PA and positive child development to two specific areas. First, there is a need to translate the longstanding and evidence-based findings for PA among adolescents to younger populations of children including those in the kindergarten years (ages 4 to 6). Second, there is a need to apply a social justice perspective to the PA disparities found among underserved children to develop nuanced evidence regarding how PA behaviors and outcomes may vary across sub-groups of children. This dissertation aligns itself with these recent PA research efforts. Specifically, it seeks to further evidence regarding how PA participation manifests among children in the kindergarten years, with particular foci on (a) its potential to increase cognitive and academic outcomes and (b) its varying effects for different children. As such, this dissertation exists at the intersection of social work, public health, and education. The first analysis is an examination of PA behaviors across 10 different sub-types with a secondary focus on what demographic characteristics may be associated with participation in each form. The second analysis is an examination of whether schools’ provision of PA in the form of physical education and recess is associated with students’ cognitive and academic ability. Finally, the third analysis is a meditational examination of whether parent’s enrollment of their children in organized PA is associated with cognitive and academic ability. 2017 Social work eng Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Michael Lambert Thesis advisor Gary Bowen Thesis advisor Jack Richman Thesis advisor Roderick Rose Thesis advisor Dianne Ward Thesis advisor text 2017-05 Wretman_unc_0153D_17136.pdf uuid:26284507-8bbe-479c-8a2d-90d525dfee3c 2017-06-19T20:28:26Z 2019-08-15T00:00:00 proquest application/pdf 914028 yes