ingest cdrApp 2018-08-23T16:46:38.987Z d39a25df-af15-48e9-aec2-c9af81a997a2 modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2018-08-23T16:47:29.758Z Setting exclusive relation addDatastream MD_TECHNICAL fedoraAdmin 2018-08-23T16:47:41.064Z Adding technical metadata derived by FITS addDatastream MD_FULL_TEXT fedoraAdmin 2018-08-23T16:48:04.088Z Adding full text metadata extracted by Apache Tika modifyDatastreamByValue RELS-EXT fedoraAdmin 2018-08-23T16:48:26.749Z Setting exclusive relation modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2018-09-27T20:46:57.056Z modifyDatastreamByValue MD_DESCRIPTIVE cdrApp 2019-03-21T21:20:38.446Z Marquet Minor Author Department of Cell Biology and Physiology School of Medicine CELL TYPE AND TISSUE SPECIFIC FUNCTIONS OF CD73 CD73 is a ubiquitously expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein that converts extracellular adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine. CD73 couples closely with ecto-apyrase (CD39), which supplies the AMP substrate via sequential dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP. CD73-generated adenosine functions in an autocrine and paracrine manner to control numerous physiological responses by activating one of four subtypes of G-protein-coupled adenosine receptors: A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R. Missense mutations in the CD73-encoding gene NT5E cause the rare, adult-onset vascular disease named ‘arterial calcifications due to deficiency of CD73’ (ACDC). Aside from direct human disease involvement, cellular and animal model studies have revealed key functions of CD73 in tissue homeostasis and pathophysiologic responses in the cardiovascular and central nervous system, as well as epithelial tissues, including the lung, kidney and liver. This review covers CD73 functions in multiple organ systems, with a focus on novel findings from the last 3-5 years. Summer 2018 2018 Cellular biology Biology Physiology adenosine, CD73, homeostasis, pathophysiologic eng Master of Science Thesis University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Cell Biology and Physiology Natasha Snider Thesis advisor Scott Randle Thesis advisor Sidney Barritt Thesis advisor Lori O'Brien Thesis advisor Temitope Keku Thesis advisor Natasha Snider Thesis advisor text Marquet Minor Creator Department of Cell Biology and Physiology School of Medicine CELL TYPE AND TISSUE SPECIFIC FUNCTIONS OF CD73 CD73 is a ubiquitously expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein that converts extracellular adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine. CD73 couples closely with ecto-apyrase (CD39), which supplies the AMP substrate via sequential dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP. CD73-generated adenosine functions in an autocrine and paracrine manner to control numerous physiological responses by activating one of four subtypes of G-protein-coupled adenosine receptors: A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R. Missense mutations in the CD73-encoding gene NT5E cause the rare, adult-onset vascular disease named ‘arterial calcifications due to deficiency of CD73’ (ACDC). Aside from direct human disease involvement, cellular and animal model studies have revealed key functions of CD73 in tissue homeostasis and pathophysiologic responses in the cardiovascular and central nervous system, as well as epithelial tissues, including the lung, kidney and liver. This review covers CD73 functions in multiple organ systems, with a focus on novel findings from the last 3-5 years. Cellular biology Biology Physiology adenosine; CD73; homeostasis; pathophysiologic Master of Science Masters Thesis University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Cell Biology and Physiology Natasha Snider Thesis advisor Scott Randle Thesis advisor Sidney Barritt Thesis advisor Lori O'Brien Thesis advisor Temitope Keku Thesis advisor Natasha Snider Thesis advisor 2018 2018-08 eng text Marquet Minor Creator Department of Cell Biology and Physiology School of Medicine CELL TYPE AND TISSUE SPECIFIC FUNCTIONS OF CD73 CD73 is a ubiquitously expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein that converts extracellular adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine. CD73 couples closely with ecto-apyrase (CD39), which supplies the AMP substrate via sequential dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP. CD73-generated adenosine functions in an autocrine and paracrine manner to control numerous physiological responses by activating one of four subtypes of G-protein-coupled adenosine receptors: A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R. Missense mutations in the CD73-encoding gene NT5E cause the rare, adult-onset vascular disease named ‘arterial calcifications due to deficiency of CD73’ (ACDC). Aside from direct human disease involvement, cellular and animal model studies have revealed key functions of CD73 in tissue homeostasis and pathophysiologic responses in the cardiovascular and central nervous system, as well as epithelial tissues, including the lung, kidney and liver. This review covers CD73 functions in multiple organ systems, with a focus on novel findings from the last 3-5 years. Cellular biology Biology Physiology adenosine; CD73; homeostasis; pathophysiologic Master of Science Masters Thesis University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Graduate School Degree granting institution Natasha Snider Thesis advisor Scott Randle Thesis advisor Sidney Barritt Thesis advisor Lori O'Brien Thesis advisor Temitope Keku Thesis advisor Natasha Snider Thesis advisor 2018 2018-08 eng text Minor_unc_0153M_18041.pdf uuid:4d61a3a3-04fd-499f-b827-650c7ec67b08 2020-08-23T00:00:00 2018-07-19T19:03:20Z proquest application/pdf 661408