Collections > Southern Oral History Program Interviews > Interviews > SOHP Series A. Southern Politics > A.003. Southern Politics: North Carolina Politics

A.003. Southern Politics: North Carolina Politics

These interviews are part of a North Carolina politics project begun in 1994 aimed at understanding how North Carolinians have dealt with the changes that have transformed the state since the Great Depression. The overarching themes of the interviews are the realignment in North Carolina party politics and the Republican reemergence; the evolution of African American political activity in North Carolina since the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; the evolution of women's political activity in North Carolina since the 1960s; and the centrality of cultural and social politics in the state's political contests and debates in the same time period. These projects were launched with a gift from Walter Royal Davis which enabled the Southern Oral History Program and the Academic Affairs Library to establish the Davis Oral History Fund. The other projects focus on University history; women's leadership and grassroots activism; business history; the broadcast media; and memory and community studies. Project coordinator for the North Carolina politics project is William Link of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. The majority of the interviews were conducted by Joseph Mosnier, a graduate student in history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Other interviews were conducted by Jonathan Houghton as part of his dissertation research on the history of the Republican Party in North Carolina or by Howard Covington and Marion Ellis. The overarching themes of the interviews, particularly those by Mosnier, are (a) the realignment in North Carolina party politics and the Republican reemergence; (b) the evolution of African American political activity in North Carolina since the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965; (c) the evolution of women's political activity in North Carolina since the 1960s; and (d) the centrality of cultural and social politics in the state's political contests and debates in the same time period.

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