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This quantitative study was designed to determine whether randomly selected North Carolina middle schools categorized as meeting expected or high growth standards on student achievement measures exhibited statistically significant differences on indicators of instructional coherence compared to schools not so designated. The researcher hypothesized that a statistically significant positive correlation would exist between program coherence and student achievement at the middle school level. Respondents completed web-based surveys designed to measure teacher and principal perceptions of instructional program coherence in each middle school. The indicators used to determine the extent, or level, of coherence within the schools were taken from a prior study in Chicago that discovered a positive relationship between program coherence and student achievement at the elementary level. The researcher used SPSS Version 15 Pearson bivariate correlation reports, along with data taken from Qualtrics, to analyze findings from the study. The results did not indicate a statistically significant positive correlation between program coherence and student achievement in randomly selected North Carolina middle schools. Possible reasons for the findings, including a discussion of rival hypotheses, are discussed. Implications and recommendations for future research are also included in the final chapter.