Individual and household characteristics of persons with Plasmodium falciparum malaria in sites with varying endemicities in Kinshasa Province, Democratic Republic of the Congo Public Deposited

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  • Parr, Jonathan B
    • Affiliation: School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine
  • Emch, Michael
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Geography
  • Thwai, Kyaw L
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
  • Levitz, Lauren
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
  • Carrel, Margaret
    • Other Affiliation: Department of Geographical & Sustainability Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, USA
  • Mwandagalirwa, Melchior K
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
    • Other Affiliation: Ecole de Sante Publique, Faculte de Medecine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Goel, Varun
    • Affiliation: College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Geography
  • Meshnick, Steven R.
    • Affiliation: Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Epidemiology
  • Tshefu, Antoinette
    • Other Affiliation: Ecole de Sante Publique, Faculte de Medecine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Janko, Mark
    • Other Affiliation: Global Health Institute, Duke University, Durham, USA
Abstract
  • Abstract Background The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) bears a large share of global malaria burden despite efforts to control and eliminate the disease. More detailed understanding of individual and household level characteristics associated with malaria are needed, as is an understanding of how these characteristics vary spatiotemporally and across different community-level malaria endemicities. An ongoing study in Kinshasa Province is designed to address gaps in prior malaria surveillance in the DRC by monitoring malaria across seasons, age groups and in high and low malaria sites. Across seven sites, 242 households and 1591 individuals are participating in the study. Results of the enrollment questionnaire, rapid diagnostic tests and PCR testing of dried blood spots are presented. Results Overall malaria prevalence in the study cohort is high, 27% by rapid diagnostic test and 31% by polymerase chain reaction, and malaria prevalence is highly varied across very small geographic distances. Malaria prevalence is highest in children aged 6–15. While the majority of households own bed nets, bed net usage is less than 50%. Conclusions The study cohort will provide an understanding of how malaria persists in populations that have varying environmental exposures, varying community-level malaria, and varying access to malaria control efforts.
Date of publication
Identifier
  • doi:10.1186/s12936-017-2110-7
Resource type
  • Article
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  • In Copyright
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  • The Author(s)
Language
  • English
Bibliographic citation
  • Malaria Journal. 2017 Nov 09;16(1):456
Publisher
  • BioMed Central
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